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Let people know what’s on the local literary calendar

Nothing like a vibrant literary culture to make a city worth living in. But if no-one knows about it, what difference does it make…it’s like it doesn’t exist, right? Which is why there’s a category on Literary Tourist for Local Calendars: websites that tell the world about what’s going on locally literarily. Not too many have made themselves known to us yet, so please, if you’re aware of a good one in your town, send us the link. In Ottawa, for example, we’ve got a great one at bywords.ca

In fact, if cities are at all interested in developing themselves culturally they should get behind sites like these, or, if nothing’s shakin, set one up themselves. For example:

” Livewithculture.ca is a legacy project of the 2005/06 TO Live With Culture campaign, a 16-month celebration of Toronto’s extraordinary arts and cultural communities. From September 2005 to December 2006, Live With Culture showcased the vibrant and diverse cultural activities happening in the city each and every day.

Originally conceived as an event listing portal — the result of a collaboration between the City of Toronto Culture Division and the Toronto Arts Council Foundation — the site was revamped in 2009 to become a blog about Torontonians living with culture. Our objective is to shine a light on every strata of the city’s thriving cultural sector. We talk to the stars of a show but also to the men and women in the trenches, working the lights, building the sets, planning the exhibitions.

Toronto’s Agenda for Prosperity recognizes creativity as one of the city’s most important economic drivers. Between 1991 and 2004, creative occupations in Toronto grew at more than three times the rate of the total labour force. More than 133,000 people earn their living in this sector, which generates $9 billion in GDP annually.

Live With Culture began as a key recommendation in the 2003 Culture Plan for the Creative City. The Plan called for the City of Toronto to catch the wave created by a number of Cultural Renaissance capital projects. It recommended that Toronto build on this opportunity through a celebration of creativity in 2006 to draw greater local and international attention to culture in Toronto. Financial support for the campaign came from all three levels of government.”

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