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Queen Anne laces roadways

What’s with all the Daucus carota (common names include wild carrot, (UK) bird’s nest, bishop’s lace, and (US) Queen Anne’s

lace) trimming our roadways this year? Daucus carota, says Wiki, is a variable biennial plant, usually growing up to 1 m tall and flowering from June to August. The umbels are claret-coloured or pale pink before they open, then bright




and rounded


when in full flower, measuring 3–7 cm wide with a festoon of bracts beneath; finally, as they turn to seed, they contract and become concave like a bird’s nest. The dried umbels detach from the plant, becoming tumbleweeds.[1]

Very similar in appearance to the deadly Poison Hemlock, Daucus carota is distinguished by a mix of bi-pinnate and tri-pinnate leaves, fine hairs on its stems and leaves, a root that smells like carrots, and occasionally a single dark red flower in its center

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One Response to “Queen Anne laces roadways”

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