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Making Faces: Jim Rimmer (trailer)

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ph0ooDzD4ZQ

Documentary on the cutting of metal type by Jim Rimmer, produced by Richard Kegler

More on Jim Rimmer from the Alcuin Society:

"Scores of printers, both new and established, have come to Rimmer’s door over the years asking for help, whether it be casting type or figuring out a way to fix some piece of archaic machinery. His career began as an apprentice typesetter at a Vancouver print shop in the 1950s. A childhood artistic bent eventually allowed him to expand into graphic design, but always with a passion for type. In the 1970s he was type director at the Lanston Monotype Corportion during its brief incarnation in Vancouver. Over the years he has created 190 digital and seven metal typefaces, the latter engraved and cast in his own studio. Although his book output has been limited-Leaves is just the third book from his Pie Tree Press & Type Foundry imprint-his broadsides are widely seen, and he printed a number of pamphlets and books for Colophon Books in the 1980s."

And if you like that, why not buy this (via Fine Press Book Association Blog):

Author: Jim Rimmer
Publisher: Gaspereau Press
Genre: Autobiography
Details: $59.95 / 9781554470624 / trade hardcover
Release date: 24 October 2008
A new and expanded trade edition of Jim Rimmer’s letterpress limited-edition original makes available the autobiography of this gifted type designer and private-press printer.

Beginning with his less than shining early academic career, Rimmer recounts his first experiences setting type at Vancouver Technical High School and leaving school after grade ten for a six-year apprenticeship in the composing room at J.W. Boyd & Sons in the 1950s. With stories about the colourful characters who inhabit the printing trade and his alternately calamitous and successful attempts at refurbishing printing and typecasting machinery, Rimmer revels in the influences and misadventures that have shaped his life.

Pie Tree Press contains reproductions of Rimmer’s illustrations and presswork, as well as samples of his original metal and digital type designs. The book also includes photographs and detailed descriptions of Rimmer’s unique typecutting processes and a new chapter on his experiences with Giampa Textware creating digital fonts in the 1980s and 90s.

This book is a trade hardcover. The text is typeset in Rimmer’s Amethyst Pro and printed offset on wove-finish paper making 128 pages trimmed to 7 × 10 inches. The sheets are Smyth sewn, and case bound in cloth-covered boards stamped in foil. The book includes over 30 illustrations.

Jim Rimmer is a designer, illustrator, typographer and type designer. Rimmer was born and raised in Vancouver, BC, and worked for many years as a commercial designer. He was type director at Lanston Monotype during the 1970s when it was based in Vancouver. At his Rimmer Type Foundry in New Westminster, BC, he has created 190 digital and seven metal typefaces.

 
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One Response to “Making Faces: Jim Rimmer (trailer)”

  1. Art Durkee Says:

    For anyone who loves Rimmer’s typefaces, or the Lanston set of faces, I recommend a visit to P22 Foundry, out of Buffalo, who specialize in releasing historical and artistic typefaces:

    http://www.p22.com/

    There are several digitized versions available of Rimmer and Lanston faces, and a whole heck of a lot more.

    (No commercial association here, just a plug for a foundry I like and respect, and from whom I’ve purchased several useful fonts.)

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